Category Archives: Spanish Culture

Damas Goyesca of Ronda

Since the inception of the Corrida Goyesca in Ronda’s September fair in 1954, the Damas Goyesca of Ronda have been the official representatives of the city, and welcoming committee for visiting dignitaries.

The role is exceptionally demanding, not only from the responsibility of the role, but also from the demanding schedule of training, and gown fittings before the build up to the week’s festivities.

So exceptionally popular have been the Damas Goyesca, that in 2009, a bronze statue of a Goyesca lady was inaugurated in Alameda park, directly across from the statue of Pedro Romero, Ronda’s most famous bullfighter.

Every year a president of the Damas Goyesca is chosen, usually she is a woman well respected in Ronda, someone who has earned the affection of the people of Ronda, and who is held up as a model of womanhood for others to emulate.

At the same time, fourteen younger Rondeñas are picked to support the president in her duties, typically the younger Damas Goyesca will be in their teens, and of course chosen for their beauty, as well as their grace.

Why the “Goyesca” Ladies?

Every year in Ronda several of the town’s ladies are chosen to be the Damas Goyescas, and represent the ladies seen in some of Francisco de Goya’s paintings of bullfighting and pageantry from the late 18th century. Many of Goya’s paintings were in fact commissioned by a tapestry workshop in Madrid, the aim being to print the paintings on fabric.

When Goya painted his portraits of nobility, the fashion of the day was for colourful fabrics, and matching accessories such as shoes, fans, hairpieces etc. The gowns worn by Ronda’s Dames Goyesca are not exact copies of those seen in Goya’s paintings, instead they are designed to reflect the matador designs seen in Goya’s paintings of Pedro Romero, so can be said to be complimentary rather than historically correct.

Some art historians argue Goya’s paintings of the Duchess of Alba are the inspiration for the gowns worn by the Damas Goyesca, and to a lesser extent this might be true, in that many of the simpler gowns worn by the ladies are very reminiscent. The more complex designs however have been developed in the 20th century in response to perceived fashions of the 18th century, and as such are even more stunning and beautiful than they would have been.

Each outfit can cost many thousands of Euros, everything is custom made to suit the lady, right down to handmade shoes and lace shawls. In addition, each Goyesca lady usually has another gown for less formal occasions, and perhaps a third for specific medal ceremonies.


The Grazalema Guide

The best way to see all our web projects in one place is over at the Grazalema Guide.

The Grazalema Guide – Tourist Information Portal for the Sierra de Grazalema, Wildside Holidays, The town of Ronda and the Caminito del Rey.

https://grazalemaguide.com/

Where to see Flamenco in Ronda

Flamenco music has it’s origins in ancient Andalucian history, possibly well before the Moorish settlements, and is believed by many experts to be a complex amalgam of Iberian, Arabic, Shepherdic, and Gitano musical styles that really matured after the reconquest of 1492, and then over the next few centuries. Over the last millenium Flamenco has spread to the rest of Spain and the former Spanish colonies in Central and South America.

Continue reading Where to see Flamenco in Ronda

Buy The Ronda Printable Guide and City Map

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What is there to see in Ronda Spain?

Welcome to one of Spain’s most visited cities (and for good reason.) Our little city is very compact and in fact from arriving in Ronda, to seeing the Real Maestranza bullring, the Puente Nuevo and El Tajo gorge, the many beautiful churches, our museums, or the wonderful coffee shops, restaurants and tapas bars, we have it all within a short 30 minute walk so a guide and map for Ronda Spain would be helpful?

We have received many emails from people asking for a printed version of Ronda Today so we have created a 21 page A4 essential Guide and map for Ronda Spain  from some of the most popular articles on this website.

At just 5 Euros (Paypal) It is well worth the small investment if you are planning to visit the “City of Dreams” for a week, a couple of days or just a day. The guide contains Ronda Todays’ most important tourist information articles and includes a map of Ronda city, the most popular monuments and nearby places to visit including information on the Sierra de Grazalema and the white villages (Pueblos Blancos).

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Just click the link below, pay via Paypal and you will receive an email with a link to download the guide to your computer. It’s a PDF document so you can store it on your machine and print it straight away.

If you don’t want to use paypal then drop me a line at clive@rondatoday.com for other methods of payment. However, paypal is free to use, takes almost all types of payment cards and you don’t need to create a paypal account to use the service. Best of all it is free (No transfer charges) for the buyer.

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Celia Morales, a truly talented Flamenco guitarist in Ronda

No trip to Ronda would be complete without hearing at least a small amount of Flamenco guitar. But to visit one of Celias concerts is an absolute treat. She is one of the most talented flamenco guitarist I have ever heard and she can be seen playing at Calle Calvo Asensio, 8. (RONDA) at 6pm and 7.30pm most nights. The concerts last for 1 hour.

At 15 euros per person, the entrance fee is amazingly cheap to see this wonderful composer and musician. You can go to her website and hear some of her work as the music starts to load as you open the home page. Check out the below video to see here in action. Truly talented.

The Spanish Flamenco – A Personal View

“Flamenco”—the word calls up an image of a slender dancer in an elaborate, ruffled costume with her fringed shawl and her castanets. Certainly, this stereotype has been perpetuated in everything from airline posters to dolls made for souvenirs. To some, this is flamenco for tourists, as they embrace the cante jondo, the deep song of agonizing lament sung by a man, a cantaora, without accompaniment, or with a single guitar. This, they claim, is authentic flamenco, the blues of Andalucía, improvised in jam sessions called juergas, sung because it must be sung, not because someone is listening or watching.

Continue reading The Spanish Flamenco – A Personal View