Category Archives: Tourism

Come and visit Ronda and the surrounding areas, or plan your itinerary around the most popular sites, and some of the lesser known things to do. Ronda is much more than the bullring and new bridge (Puente Nuevo). There are also the Arab Baths, the Water Mine, the Mondragon Palace, and outside the city, the Cueva de la Pileta, or the Dolmen structures at Antequera. Further afield are the beaches of the Costa del Sol, Sevilla’s cathedral and palace, or Cordoba and the Mezquita. And of course for discovering the beautiful Sierra de Grazalema have a look at Wildside Holidays – Grazalema

Ronda’s Arab Baths Now Accessible for People with Disabilities

Francisco Cañestro Opens the Arab Baths

Yesterday the Councillor for Tourism Francisco Cañestro, and the Junta de Andalucía’s Minister of Tourism, Commerce and Sport, Luciano Alonso Alonso officially reopened the Arab Baths in Ronda after extensive renovations allowing wheelchair access for one of Andalucía’s most important Moorish monuments.

Continue reading Ronda’s Arab Baths Now Accessible for People with Disabilities

Ronda’s La Algaba Prehistoric Center to get Science Center

The Andalucían government has announced plans to decelop a science centre at Ronda’s Finca La Algaba Prehistoric Centre to further research into lifestyles and technologies of prehistoric peoples who inhabited the Serranía and Andalucía.

Currently La Algaba best known activity is the ‘El Poblado’ village, a reproduction paleolithic and neolithic village used as part of an archeological experiment to discover how prehistoric prople lived, worshipped, cooked, made pottery, hunted, etc. The layout of the village is based on those found at Acinipo and the Silla del Moro neolithic villages.

In recent years La Algaba has become the benchmark from which all other European university archeological experiments are based, in part due to seminars developed in Ronda that go beyond simply interpreting archeological data to recreating the prehistoric implements and other archeological items, and then conducting experiments to determine how they were used.

The science park, the first in Andalucía, will complement existing programs at La Algaba such as the protection of traditional seed stock, and breeding of native cattle breeds known to have been important to prehistoric people. Neolithic wheat varieties are also being grown organically to learn more about food preparation in prehistoric times.

Maria Elena Sanchez, the director of Finca La Algaba, told Ronda Today she is excited that the hard work and effort expended in Ronda has been recognized in this way, and that the science park represents a qualitative leap forward for archeological experimentation in Europe.

For more information, see Finca La Algaba’s prehistoric village website.

New Gate at the Entrance to Ronda

Today in Ronda News, the city now has a new gate which will welcome visitors to the city, and is the first gate installed since the middle of the 18th century, although the new gate is fittingly more modern as Ronda breaks the shackles of the past and becomes a modern European city.

Designed and built by the students of the Employment Workshop “Arunda”, the  gates are made of recycled metals salvaged in Ronda and stand four metres high. The gates are located in the park being developed next to Ronda’s Palace of Justice at the end of Avenida de Málaga.

The students are all unemployed people learning a new skill, and this project is described as having been hugely motivational, with most putting in extra hours to see the gates completed to a high standard.

Ronda’s mayor Antonio Marín Lara, and the delegate for Employment Josefa Valley were on hand to congratulate the students for their efforts.

In the coming weeks the new parkland will be completed, and will showcase the gates as well as  a new fountain. It is hoped the area will be a welcoming sight for visitors to the city, as well as an attractive space for residents in surrounding streets to relax.

Christmas Lights and Shop Windows in Ronda

The 4th of December was the day the Christmas lights went on in Ronda, heralding the start of the Christmas holiday season, which in Spain extends through to the 6th January.

Christmas in Spain is unlike English speaking countries. Here the 25th of December is a religious holiday, whilst the 5th of January, known as the three kings day, is the important day for giving gifts. Of course Hollywood’s influence means this is becoming muddled and children in Spain often get presents on the 25th and 5th.

Switching on the Christmas lights is an important occasion, made even more special as this is a long weekend celebrating two holidays, Constitution Day on the 6th, and the Feast of the Immaculate Conception on the 8th.

The streets of Ronda were filled with people coming out to see this years lights, and to mix and mingle with friends in coffee shops, start the Christmas present buying spree, and enjoy the fresh evening air before the cold of winter really hits us.

The excitement was contagious, children were running and playing, calling to each other, staring with wild eyes in the windows of the shops with nativity scenes or Santa decorations, and Rondeños of all ages couldn’t contain themselves.

Several of the churches held special evening Mass services, so many in Ronda were wearing their Sunday best, though many more weren’t, being content to simply walk and enjoy the evening with friends.

The Christmas lights run the length of Carrera Espinel, Calle Sevilla, Virgen de la Paz, Calle Armiñan, Avenida de Málaga, Avenida de Martinez Astein, and are also in Plaza Socorro. The open air nativity is in the bandstand in Plaza Socorro.

While walking down La Bola taking the photos you see below, our friendly local busker was dressed as Santa playing Christmas songs on his accordion while singing “Merry Christmas” over and over again. We wondered if he knew the words and was just singing what he did know. Sadly the battery on the camera went flat and I wasn’t able to capture his Christmas spirit.

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