Category Archives: History

The Tourist Ticket (The best way to visit Rondas top attractions)

When you get to Ronda (even if you have found Ronda Today useful) the first place on your lisit of visits should be the Tourist Office located by the bull ring (Plaza de Toros.) It is here that the English speaking staff can give you the most up to date info on whats going on in Ronda such as concerts, exhibitions and other events.

But, also, they can sell you the “Tourist Ticket” (Bono Turístico in Spanish.) This one price ticket allows you access to some of the “on the list” places to visit in Ronda. http://www.turismoderonda.es/en/heritage-and-culture/cultural-activities

Prices are 8 euros per adult (6.50 if you have a group of 10 or more people) and under 14 years olds are free.

You can buy the Tourist Tickets in the tourist office, the Museum, the Arab baths and the Puente Nuevo.

This ticket is recommended if you are planning to visit these places anyway as there is a saving of 3 to 5 euros per person (enough saving to spend on a nice tapas :)

Churches in Ronda

Ronda is famous for it’s churches built after the reconquest as Catholic Spain asserted it’s control over the formerly Muslim city. Four of the many churches in Ronda are especially noted for their architecture or the story behind them, and all are part of every great tour of Ronda.

Christianity in Ronda began with Visigothic control of Iberia after the collapse of the Roman Empire in the 5th century, and quickly became the dominant faith. Arab invaders entered Iberia and overran the Visigoths beginning in 711 AD, and until 1485 Ronda was a Muslim stronghold alternating between liberal interpretations of Muslim faith and the more conservative Sharia versions. Continue reading Churches in Ronda

Romans in Ronda

The Roman Empire had been expanding out of the Italian peninsula and finally found it’s way to Iberia as Roman and Carthaginian forces battled for control of the Mediterranean, and sadly the peace known around Ronda was shattered beginning in the 2nd century BC. Rome and Carthage fought two bloody and protracted wars, with Spain suffering terribly as Roman armies vied for control of key supply routes.

Continue reading Romans in Ronda

Andalusia, Plaza del Socorro and Blas Infante

Visitors to Ronda are often confused about why our central plaza features a statue of a semi-naked man with two lions by his side and a couple of pillars behind him. What is their significance, and why do so many people take photos of the fountain?

The answer lies in Andalusian nationalism and one of the most important events in recent Andalusian political history, the Assembly of Ronda in 1918 when the father of Andalusian nationalism, Blas Infante, unfurled the flag and symbols of Andalusia whilst standing on the first floor balcony of the ‘Circulo de Artistas’; the building directly behind the fountain with red CA lettering above the windows. Continue reading Andalusia, Plaza del Socorro and Blas Infante

Learn about Ronda with Entrelenguas

If you are planning a trip to Ronda you should really think about paying a visit to the Entrelenguas language school. Well, it’s much more than a language school as they can offer you guided tours of Ronda, visits to vineyards, cooking courses, food tasting and tapas tours amongst many other activities. have a look at their website http://entrelenguas.es/

They also have a lot of events planned for this year and you can stay up to date with what’s going on here… http://entrelenguas.es/culture-ronda/culture-ronda-events/

Located a hundred meters or so up the street from the Almocabar archway gate… Why not call in for a cup of coffee with these friendly people and get them to show you some corners of Ronda that you would never find on your own!

 

Shrine of Our Lady of Sorrows (Templete de la Virgen de los Dolores)

Ronda and the Serrania surround it have been lawless lands for millennia, not even the iron grip of the Almohads could stamp out rebellions and banditry, so it is hardly surprising that capital punishment has been so widely used.

In Ronda (close to the junction between Calle Santa Cecilia and Calle Virgen de los Dolores) nowhere is this more obvious and chilling than the Temple of Our Lady of Sorrows, also known as the Shrine of the Hanged, with its frightening depictions of condemned men’s eyes bulging as they desperately try to get a last breath while the hangman’s noose crushes their windpipe. Continue reading Shrine of Our Lady of Sorrows (Templete de la Virgen de los Dolores)